Judith Armatta

Judith Armatta is a lawyer, journalist, and human-rights activist

"When will we ever learn . . . ?"

"Regarding the hate-filled killings in Orlando: Skimming Facebook today, I have seen two posts that recall incidents in American history where more than 50 people were killed (Wounded Knee in 1890 and the East St. Louis killings of African-Americans in July 1917). Such things simply reinforce my belief that the American press lacks historical insight or sacrifices it in the name of expediency. But in the grand scheme of things, what does it matter? Native Americans, African Americans and the LGBT community have one thing in common; they are the targets of hate. Ranking them by numbers simply provides an index of available targets and killing resources, nothing more. Orlando is simply the latest indictment of society's desire to prove superiority through lethal force." -Timothy Charles Butz

I met Tim eons ago in Washington, D.C., where we were both living in the 1970s. He was an activist with Vietnam Veterans Against the War, hailing from Ohio. I was working for Rep. John Seiberling (D-Ohio), an anti-war congressman. I thought Tim’s comments on his Facebook page were thought-provoking and worth sharing. This is not a competition, it is a tragedy, one more in a long line. “When will we ever learn. . . .?”

Typhoid Mary of the Blogosphere

            Mary Mallon, born in 1869, is best known as “Typhoid Mary.” She is iconic for allegedly  spreading typhoid to 51 people, three of whom died. Since there was no known cure, Mary was isolated for nearly three decades of her life. Today, we apply the term to people who infect (wittingly or unwittingly) us with information we otherwise might avoid hearing. That, at any rate, is the way in which I use the term here.

            When I was living in the Balkans, then in The Hague reporting on the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, I wrote regular letters to a group of friends and colleagues about my experiences. They were mostly disturbing, focusing as they did on war crimes, genocide, torture, and crimes against humanity. I was grateful to those recipients of my missives who actually read them, though they could hardly have brightened their days. One brave friend, who may have read them all when he could have been watching basketball or hanging out at the local pub, endearingly described me as “The Typhoid Mary of the Internet.” It pretty much fit and we are still friends. So, when I decided to write a blog, an amended version of the title seemed apropos. Henceforth, this blog will be known as belonging to “The Typhoid Mary of the Blogosphere.” Those with courage enter here.

            My intent is to blog about the subjects that stir my conscience, yet leave me feeling helpless. Writing is how I know to influence people -- revealing what is hidden, witnessing what is distressing, offering suggestions for change, passing along the wisdom of others, and most of all, telling stories. Writing moves me from despair. In the best of circumstances, it means I am not alone with sadness and anger that heavies my soul. Julian Beck in The Life of the Theater wrote an exhortation that has guided me since I first read it over four decades ago:

“I see all the danger, the dissolution, I am not content, I recognize the emergency in every house and place….

It is not what we do not know but what we do not feel.

The Theatre of Emergency is the theatre of feeling.

For a feelingless society, feeling.

For a fractured people, unification.

Realization. The people as one, one.

A theatre not for people, but at one with people.

Mending the gap between human nature and the human mind. Stein. We know what class hatred and race hatred are, but we can’t get ourselves to really do anything beyond petty liberal gestures because we don’t really feel what we believe. To change the world.

The theatre of change. Of emergency. Of feeling.

When we feel, we will feel the emergency: when we feel the emergency, we will act: when we act, we will change the world.”

            Yet I do want to be a comedienne. I’d love to make people laugh. I want to laugh more myself. Another adage I try to live by is attributed to Emma Goldman: “If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be a part of your revolution.”

            I hope some of you will take this journey with me. It is not just a telling, but a hearing. I am still teachable (I think). I know that something new comes from respectful discussion among many. So, let’s see what we can create.

Prosecution Will Appeal Seselj Judgment

Good news, folks, though not unexpected! I mean, what would you do??? The Office of the Prosecutor at the ICTY (now MICT) has announced that they will appeal the Seselj judgment. To do otherwise would be shameful. Here’s the OTP announcement:

Note: the ICTY is now called the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals. See below.



United Nations - Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals

PRESS RELEASE

PROSECUTOR

(Exclusively for the use of the media. Not an official document.)

 



Statement by MICT Prosecutor Serge Brammertz Regarding Appeal of the Vojislav Šešelj Trial Judgement

The Hague, 6 April - After reviewing the written reasons given by the Trial Chamber Majority for acquitting Vojislav Šešelj of all charges, my Office has decided to appeal the Judgement. Given the far reaching nature of the errors we have identified in the Majority Judgement, we underscore for the victims of the crimes that the forthcoming appeal is of utmost priority for this Office.

As we will explain in more detail in our forthcoming notice of appeal, we consider there has been a fundamental failure by the Majority to perform its judicial function. The Majority has omitted to properly adjudicate core aspects of the Prosecution’s case, including by: failing to consider large parts of the evidentiary record; failing to provide proper reasons for its conclusions; failing to properly apply the ‘beyond reasonable doubt’ standard; failing to consider the charges against Vojislav Šešelj in light of the pervasive pattern of crimes proved; failing to distinguish between the ultimate political objective pursued by the joint criminal enterprise members and the criminal means employed to achieve it; making unreasonable and conflicting factual findings; and failing to properly apply the elements of modes of liability such as joint criminal enterprise and aiding and abetting in accordance with established case-law. 

At the same time, we consider that the Majority unreasonably allowed for the possibility that criminal conduct was simply a lawful contribution to the war effort, despite the overwhelming body of evidence pointing against it. In our view, this led the Majority to unreasonably credit the possibility that: expelling civilians was a humanitarian gesture; that incendiary hate speech was simply morale boosting for the Serb forces; and that the deployment of ethnic cleansing forces was a measure to protect the Serb population. In sweeping disregard of the large number of crimes proved at trial the Majority concluded that there was no widespread or systematic attack against the civilian population in parts of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina as required for crimes against humanity. 

As with all appeals filed by my Office, we will exert maximum effort to ensure that our appeal in the Vojislav Šešelj case is litigated efficiently, effectively and fairly in accordance with the prescribed appeals process of the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals. 



*****


The Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT) was established by UN Security Council Resolution 1966 (2010) to complete the remaining work of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia after the completion of their respective mandates. The MICT has two branches, one in Arusha, Tanzania, and one in The Hague, Netherlands.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
www.unmict.org